Terroir for great wines

The Count’s vineyard is located on the Plateau Cordais to the north of Gaillac, a wine region in the south-west of France that has fallen into oblivion. Embedded in gently rolling hills along the river Tarn, the elevated plain with its sparse soil is deemed the best terroir of the region with ideal conditions for great wines.

Terroir for great wines

The Count’s vineyard is located on the Plateau Cordais to the north of Gaillac, a wine region in the south-west of France that has fallen into oblivion. Embedded in gently rolling hills along the river Tarn, the elevated plain with its sparse soil is deemed the best terroir of the region with ideal conditions for great wines.

Terroir for great wines

The Count’s vineyard is located on the Plateau Cordais to the north of Gaillac, a wine region in the south-west of France that has fallen into oblivion. Embedded in gently rolling hills along the river Tarn, the elevated plain with its sparse soil is deemed the best terroir of the region with ideal conditions for great wines.

Terroir for great wines

The Count’s vineyard is located on the Plateau Cordais to the north of Gaillac, a wine region in the south-west of France that has fallen into oblivion. Embedded in gently rolling hills along the river Tarn, the elevated plain with its sparse soil is deemed the best terroir of the region with ideal conditions for great wines.

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The vineyards: ancient wine country, newly interpreted

Steeped in history, the Count’s vineyards extend over almost 70 acres around the château. Where his predecessor used to produce rather rustic Cuvées from Syrah, Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon as well as local grape varieties, Duras and Braucol, today Ferdinand von Thun and his oenologists cultivate mainly Syrah, Merlot and Cabernet Franc.

When Ferdinand von Thun bought the Château on the Plateau Cordais from his predecessor, he found 25 acres of newly planted vines. This included Syrah, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon as well as local varieties Duras and Braucol. A multitude of grape varieties, in other words, which until that point had only been established on the Château to make Cuvées, as it is required by the law. In order to discover the specific way in which each grape variety would express the terroir, the Count and his oenological advisor, Riccardo Cotarella, started with making varietal wines. In 2000, they reached the following conclusion: wines made from Duras and Braucol simply did not meet the desired style of Comte de Thun. They were banished.

Renaissance of a unique terroir

Gaillac is a wine region in the south-west of France that suffered greatly in the past and is now quietly sleepy, but with incredibly high potential, which Ferdinand von Thun and his friend Riccardo intend to re-awaken with their Comte de Thun vision. From the 13th to the 17th century, the robust, dark red wines of the region were in demand in all of Europe, especially because storage improved them over time, meaning they could be shipped without problems.

The excellent reputation of wines from Gaillac reached the English royal court, and even the upper classes in Bordeaux took deliveries of their rivals’ wines. Today, the harmonious connection between terroir, microclimate, engaging history and passionate people is what makes the region once again a cradle for great wines.

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Terroir_Region_Slide_02

Renaissance of a unique terroir

Gaillac is a wine region in the south-west of France that suffered greatly in the past and is now quietly sleepy, but with incredibly high potential, which Ferdinand von Thun and his friend Riccardo intend to re-awaken with their Comte de Thun vision. From the 13th to the 17th century, the robust, dark red wines of the region were in demand in all of Europe, especially because storage improved them over time, meaning they could be shipped without problems.

The excellent reputation of wines from Gaillac reached the English royal court, and even the upper classes in Bordeaux took deliveries of their rivals’ wines. Today, the harmonious connection between terroir, microclimate, engaging history and passionate people is what makes the region once again a cradle for great wines.

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The story of the Galliac 1/2

From the late Middle Ages to the time of the Sun King Louis XIV – i.e. from the 13th to the 17th century – the region’s strong, dark and long-lasting red wines were particularly appreciated in Northern Europe and were often preferred to the thinner Bordelais wines. In wooden barrels branded with the mark of a rooster, the “Crus Tarnais” were exported to the English royal court of Henry III. (1216-1272) and Henry VIII. (1491-1574) and known all over the world as “Vins du Coq”. This first trademark in the history of wine – first used in 1387 and officially recognized in 1501 – stood for great wines, which became better and better due to their shelf life during shipping. Its success inevitably invited rivalries and, ultimately, counterfeiting.